Education Policy Research and Development

Educational policy is policy for societies future. Taking into account the psychological development of children can be a critical factor for designing and implementing education policy. Children spend a significant amount of time each day interacting with their teachers and peers. So, the way we approach children and educational environments can have a critical impact on a child’s life and cognitive development. This is why educational policies need to account for a diverse array of cultural and psychological factors. Carefully and professionally designed research can make classrooms a place where growth is fostered, rather than a place of frustration for children.

Experience with child education systems in a wide range of cultures

Much of my research has been conducted in classroom settings in various cultural environments. I have experience with working with local and national authorities such as ministries of education, teachers, and school administrators. I can work directly with parents in order to obtain direct approval for research. The research has been featured in reports by the British Psychological Society, numerous media outlets, world-class journals, and a TED talk.

Experience in quantifying difficult but important aspects of education

There are many aspects of educating our children where performance on standardized tests are not a good benchmark for understanding if the educational systems are working. Often, increasing general cognitive abilities like critical thinking and self-control are important goals for our educational systems. These complex psychological factors are difficult—if not impossible—to capture by analysing standardized tests. In these cases, quantifying performance based on psychological measures is more appropriate.

Experience developing methods for testing groups of children in ways that are cross-culturally comparable

Comparing child educational systems is often hard to do since comparisons employ many indirect measures that are not always comparable between two cultures. I have a record of successfully designing studies that can not only measure critical cognitive abilities in children at a young age, but I have also devised ways to successfully increase these abilities in children using class-room appropriate activities in multiple cultures.